Head softens approach for Ashes Pursuit




Adding to the difficulty for Head is just another thing of more recent history – he is too young to remember Australia winning a series in England, having been seven years old when a team headed by Steve Waugh hurried to a 3-0 lead and finally a 4-1 final margin in 2001.

“2001, very ancient days, I likely did not watch much of it. I was probably asleep most of the time,” Head said with a laugh. “Yeah likely’05 [was first memory]. Clearly the previous one, coming to Trent Bridge. I only watched the first couple of sessions.

I believe I was watching it with a partner at the Greek Islands. I went into The Oval and watched Smudge [Steve Smith] buy a hundred. So I have watched a little cricket . I adored watching India here last year as well. It is a place where you get thrilling cricket. So looking ahead to become involved with it.”

Head softens approach for Ashes Pursuit

But in addition, it provided invaluable clarity in terms of what his goals ought to be, something added to when he acquitted himself more than adequately against Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka in his first three Test series – these borders to third person aside.

After the SCG Test, Head was abandoned with some regrets about not finishing off the series well, something that he atoned for some time striding to a century against Sri Lanka in Canberra in Australia’s last Test before the Ashes. Given that two other centurions for that game, Kurtis Patterson and Joe Burns, did not make the last Ashes squad, Head had to have completed more work in the meantime. He described what he has been attempting to eradicate from his match.

“I believe for a long portion of my career I was somewhat, not reckless but I took the game ,” he explained. “However, as I have developed a bit and played a lot more cricket, I have got more of an understanding of the way I want to play on different wickets, particularly in the previous 12 months. Being able to accommodate to wickets throughout the country in Australia and over here, and the way I adapt my sport it has been probably a more mature approach.

“I’ve taken more time and attempted to give myself a chance a bit more than I did when I was younger. As I’ve played more cricket and got more experience I’ve managed to do so, and I found that the other week batting with Wadey [for Australia A against England Lions]. It was pleasant to spend time in the middle, and I have played a bit of cricket over here so that I know what to expect. It is about making sure I allow them bowl to me personally, but also making certain that I’m still positive and don’t alter my instincts.

Head softens approach for Ashes Pursuit

Wielding his bat like a cutlass and swinging it with enough gusto to twice be caught at third man against India last summer, Travis Head would not, at first glance, seem to be an Australian player ideally suited to the subtleties necessary to bat successfully in England.

There have been numerous similarly swashbuckling Australian talents who never really cracked it in England, not least Doug Walters and David Hookes, when confronted by slower surfaces and the ball. Adding to the problem for Head is just another thing of more recent history – he’s too young to recall Australia winning a string in England, having been seven years old when a team led by Steve Waugh hurried to a 3-0 lead and finally a 4-1 final margin in 2001.

“2001, very ancient days, I likely did not watch a lot of it. “Yeah probably’05 [was initially memory]. Clearly the last one, arriving to Trent Bridge. I only watched the first couple of sessions.

“I was over here when Ash [Agar] got 98 [in 2013]. I believe I had been watching it with a mate at the Greek Islands. I went into The Oval and observed Smudge [Steve Smith] buy a hundred. So I have watched a little cricket . I loved viewing India here last year too. It’s a place where you get thrilling cricket. So looking ahead to get involved with that.”

But in addition, it provided useful clarity in terms of what his intentions ought to be, something added to when he acquitted himself more than adequately against Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka in his first three Test series – those edges to third person aside.

Following the SCG Test, Head was left with some regrets about not finishing off the series nicely, something that he atoned for while striding into a century against Sri Lanka in Canberra in Australia’s last Test ahead of the Ashes. Given that two other centurions for that match, Kurtis Patterson and Joe Burns, failed to make the last Ashes squad, Head had to have completed more work in the interim. He explained what he’s been attempting to eradicate from his match.

“I think for a very long portion of my profession I was somewhat, not reckless but that I took the game ,” he said. “But as I’ve matured a bit and played with more cricket, I have gained more of an understanding of how I want to play on different wickets, especially in the previous 12 months. Having the ability to accommodate to wickets throughout the country in Australia and over here, and the way I adapt my game it’s been a more mature approach.

“I’ve taken more time and tried to give myself an opportunity a little more than I did when I was younger. As I’ve played cricket and gained more experience I have managed to do that, and I found the other week batting with Wadey [for Australia A against England Lions]. It was nice to spend time in the middle, and I’ve played a little cricket so that I know what to expect. It’s about making sure I let them bowl to me, but also making sure that I am still positive and do not change my natural instincts.




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